Tangy Brazilian Lemon-Garlic Shrimp Spinach Salad with {and a special giveaway!}

 

Spices make the dish, I am totally convinced.


When I first made the big leap and eliminated all artificial ingredients back in 2008, I noticed a huge difference between conventional dried herbs, spices, and rubs than their natural counterparts. 

Most spices, sadly, have fillers and MSG (though maybe not by that name) in their mixes. Lots of spices and dried herbs are irradiated, meaning that, in summary, the packaging process removes a lot of the health-boosting properties these spices have while inadvertently adding some free radicals. The whole spice industry isn't the best situation; you really do need to be conscious and know where your spices come from. If not, you could ruin your pricey grass-fed steak with chemicals.



High-quality spices are expensive, I will totally admit that. However, like I said before, they definitely make the dish, and good spices make a big difference, which is why I support smaller spice companies that come out with quality products; Samboroso is one of those companies.


For total transparency, I am an ambassador for Samboroso, which means I receive product in exchange for posting about them. However, I want to make it abundantly clear that I will never post anything about any product, within this post or in the future, that I do not believe in or back 100%. I hope you trust me on this one.

With that out of the way, Samboroso's spices are truly high quality. Samboroso is a family-owned company, and although not paleo, they have similar view and ideals when it comes to food. These spices are Brazilian, which I sadly am not super well versed in, but honestly their spices are hands-down amazing and so full of flavor. I am really obsessed and have been using them on everything from salads to steak to veggies.

Today, I have a special gift for you all today: a giveaway with Samboroso. One lucky winner will get a spice blend all to themselves, which is perfect because I also have a recipe to go along with it. See below for a rafflecopter giveaway, you know the drill.

Today's recipe is a super quick and easy shrimp and spinach salad with a little Lemon-Garlic Samboroso twist. Its a little tangy, a little spicy, and packs a whole lot of flavor. Enjoy!


Tangy Brazilian Lemon-Garlic Shrimp Spinach Salad

Serves 2 as an entree

  • 16 oz. shrimp
  • 2 tbsp. high quality, grass-fed butter
  • 1/8 cup Shiitake mushrooms, diced
  • 1 shallot, diced
  • 1 tsp. lemon juice
  • 1/2-cup olive oil
  • 2/3 cup dry white wine
  • 4 tbsp. Samboroso Lemon-Garlic Rub
  • 2 tsp. crushed red pepper flakes (or more, if preferred)
  • 5 cups spinach
  1. In a large saucepan, melt butter on medium-high heat. Add mushrooms and shallot. Sauté until shallots are translucent.
  2. Reduce heat, add lemon juice, olive oil, and wine and let simmer on low until liquid reduces by about 2/3 volume, about 10 minutes.
  3. While liquid is reducing, wash and dry spinach and place into serving bowls.
  4. Increase heat to medium-high. Add in Lemon-Garlic rub, crushed red pepper, and shrimp, stirring to ensure that spices are well incorporated and shrimp are coated. Let shrimp cook for about 5 minutes while stirring, being careful to not overcook.
  5. Remove from heat immediately and pour shrimp and liquid over spinach.
  6. Let spinach wilt slightly and enjoy.




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I guess I missed the memo...

Ok, so its October. I know this because despite my 24/7 access to virtual calendars on my iBook, my work computer, my ipad AND my iPhone (Whhhyyyyy?) I woke up on October 1st with a flood of emails to my inbox bombarding me with recipes for pumpkin flavored everything. EVERYTHING. Not only the typical pumpkin bread and pumpkin cupcakes, but pumpkin pasta, pumpkin cheesecake, pumpkin waffles. Pump. Kin. Everything. I guess I missed the mandatory pumpkin email I was supposed to send to you guys on Octobereve. Whoops, sorry guys. I’ll work on it for next year.

Now, don’t get me wrong, I’m a huge fan of pumpkin. Pumpkin season seems to epitomize fall, just as mint chocolate and candy canes summarize the Christmas season. However, as I am in my second fall of following a primal diet, pumpkin spiced foods just don’t have the same allure as they once had. Although delicious, I’ve found that lots of the store bought bases for pumpkin spice either have a lot of added sugars, or, in the liquid form, high fructose corn syrup. Thanks, but no thanks, pumpkin season.

For all of my fellow pumpkin-loving fans, I’ve decided to post the basics of any pumpkin recipe: pumpkin spice. In stores this is usually called “pumpkin pie spice”, but you can easily make it on your own for a fraction of the cost and an unbelievably higher quality.

It is my opinion that, just like buying shoes, the quality of spices is paramount to the integrity and overall product of the dish. (You know how those $400 Frye boots makes your $20 jeans look more expensive and tailored? The same concept applies here.) Just like there is a huge difference between the taste of fresh garlic and garlic powder, the difference between high quality spices and low quality spices has a vast difference in your meal, not to mention a lower probability that your dried spices contain things like mold and insect parts. Seriously.

There are a lot of really great spice stores out there, but one of my favorites, from as far back as the late 90s when I was learning how to cook in the kitchen with my dad, is The Spice House in Old Town, Chicago. Not in the Chicago area? No worries, they ship from their website. 

Another one of my favorites is the Spice and Tea Exchange in Rehoboth Beach, Delaware. Not only are the spices fantastic smelling, but their teas are excellent, and after you buy something from them, you can head straight to a walk on the beach. It’s a win-win.

Of course, high quality everything is the best for making this pumpkin spice blend, but if you had to choose, its best to go with high quality cinnamon and allspice. Cinnamon because it is the bulk of this blend, and allspice because it has a lot of dynamic flavors; I think these flavors of this ground berry that are lost within the cheaper varieties of the spice. (Bet you didn’t know that allspice was a berry, huh?) Anyway, once you have all your fabulous spices, this pumpkin spice blend is easy to put together. It will take under 5 minutes, will last a good while, and takes any plain pumpkin dish to a pumpkin spiced dish. You. Are. Welcome.


Primal-Friendly Pumpkin Spice Blend

  •  2 tbsp. ground cinnamon
  • ¾ tsp. ground ginger
  • ¾ tsp. ground cloves
  • ¾ tsp. ground nutmeg
  • ¾ tsp. ground allspice
  1. Combine all spices into a glass container or old, clean spice jar and shake. Spices should be well mixed.
  2. Store in in a cool, dry, place.